Natural Remedies for Born Worriers (Anxiety)

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Anxious

Everyone feels anxious now and then. It’s a normal emotion. For example, you may feel nervous when faced with a problem at work, before taking a test, or before making an important decision.

Anxiety disorders are different, though. They are a group of mental illnesses, the distress of which can cause a lot of hindrances in your normal lifestyle.

For people who have either if of the two,a worry or some kind of fear are never able to live normally.But with many cures, people learn to manage these feelings and get back to a fulfilling life.Some of these natural cures,when you are anxious are:

[ READ MORE ABOUT : Miseries and Happiness ]

Chamomile

If you have a jittery moment, a cuppa chamomile tea might help calm you down. Some compounds in chamomile (Matricaria recutita) bind to the same brain receptors as drugs like Valium.

You can also take it as a supplement, typically standardized to contain 1.2% apigenin (an active ingredient), along with dried chamomile flowers.

L-theanine (or green tea)

They say Japanese Buddhist monks could meditate for hours, both alert and relaxed. One reason may have been an amino acid in their green tea called L-theanine.

Research shows that L-theanine helps curb a rising heart rate and blood pressure, and a few small human studies have found that it really helps a lot when you are anxious and need to calm down.

Hops

Yes, it’s in beer, but you won’t get the tranquilizing benefits of the bitter herb hops (Humulus lupulus) from a brew. The sedative compound in hops is a volatile oil, so you get it in extracts and tinctures—and as aromatherapy in hops pillows.

Hops is often used as a sedative, to promote sleep, often with another herb, valerian.

Note: Don’t take sedative herbs if you are taking a prescription tranquilizer or sedative, and let your doctor know about any supplements you are taking.

Valerian

Some herbal supplements reduce anxiety without making you sleepy (such as L-theanine), while others are sedatives. Valerian (Valeriana officinalis) is squarely in the second category. It is a sleep aid, for insomnia. It contains sedative compounds.The German government has approved it as a treatment for sleep problems.

Valerian smells kind of nasty, so most people take it as a capsule or tincture, rather than a tea. If you want to try it, take it in the evening—not before you go to work! Valerian is often combined with other sedative herbs such as hops, chamomile, and lemon balm.

Exercise

Exercise is safe, good for the brain, and a powerful antidote to depression and anxiety, both immediately and in the long term.

“One of the major causes of anxiety is worrying about illness and health, and that dissipates when you are fit.”

Passion Flower

Anxious

In spite of its name, this herb won’t help you in love. It’s a sedative,the German government has approved,for nervous restlessness. Some studies find that it can reduce symptoms of anxiety as effectively as prescription drugs. It’s often used for insomnia.

Like other sedatives, it can cause sleepiness and drowsiness, so don’t take it—or valerian, hops, kava, lemon balm, or other sedative herbs—when you are also taking a prescription sedative.

Be careful about using more than one sedative herb at a time, and don’t take passionflower for longer than one month at a time.

 Meditate when you are Anxious

Fear is a negative emotion, unless you’re facing an actual threat and need to fight or flee. And the usefulness of fear is minimal in daily life,particularly in the form of anxiety. Stressful events can produce short-term anxiety in almost everyone, which disappears after the event.All of us know people who are “born worriers,” but their reality is much more debilitating than that title describes. Being in a state of chronic anxiety can severely limit their daily activity.


 

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